The Modern Workforce

This is the first time in history that five generations are working together.

As a result of healthier living and the financial hurdles to retirement, we find traditionalists and Baby Boomers still in the workforce. Generation X is well established, and in the coming years Millennials will be ready to move into leadership positions. The digital natives of Generation Z are just beginning to enter the fray.

Having five generations is like having five wildly different personalities on a team. There are going to be challenges and there are going to be benefits. To manage a workforce that spans five generations, you have to get at the root of human nature to bond the age gaps.

At the heart of it all, a sixty-five year old and a twenty-five year old want the same things. Their expectations, interests, styles, and values may vary, but ultimately they want the same thing.

What is that thing?

Engagement.

Engagement is an emotional commitment to an organization of people and its goals; because engagement is rooted in emotions, it is often elusive to define.

Though engagement can be difficult to quantify, the literature in organizational psychology shows that what we call “engagement” is a significant factor of employee wellbeing, productivity, and retention.

Engagement is Simple

Ultimately, engagement boils down to this simple truth:

We would rather be happy than sad.

We want to be engaged in our work. We want to like the people with whom we work. We want meaning in our work; we don’t want our jobs to be in opposition with who we are as human beings. We want to be led by someone we respect and admire.

It’s not rocket science, and yet many organizations lack a workplace culture that bolsters this simple truth, instead favoring self-serving leadership and status quo thinking.

Engagement is Universal

It doesn’t matter whether you were born in the 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s, or 90s.

No one wants to dread going to work or to spend their entire day counting down the seconds until they can go home.

In the end, we all prefer meaningful work to mind-numbing work. We all have universal needs that we can’t turn off just because we punch a time clock, put on a suit, or sit in a corner office.

Employee engagement is:

Universal. Fundamental. Imperative.

Without it, people leave. Companies lose profit.

Equilibria’s organizational psychologists have distilled their knowledge of human behavior and leadership into actionable, proven steps that you can apply to your employee engagement strategy today!

FREE E-BOOK

Create a highly engaged, sticky culture that retains the best of the best.

Ditch the listicles and download our practical guide for building engagement based on the science of human behavior coupled with practical and actionable steps you can apply today!

DOWNLOAD THE EBOOK HERE.

0 Comment
88 Views

When you think about your ability to focus, what comes to mind?

Maybe you check your email 500x times a day. Or maybe you check Facebook over and over again. Maybe you overschedule yourself or say yes to things that will interfere with your ability to accomplish what you already have on your plate.

You’ve probably read hundreds of tips for being productive like waking up early, exercising, and putting your phone on silent….the thing is, you may find yourself trying these for a day or two and then reverting back to the same old habits. The reason why is because they don’t necessarily relate to your specific life or personal strengths.

That’s why productivity comes down to self-awareness.

The power of self-awareness is that you already know yourself really well; you just have to apply that knowledge in the right way.

So here’s how.

Figure out your strengths and your weaknesses when it comes to productivity.

Do you get in the zone early in the morning, in the afternoon or late at night?

Do you do really well under pressure or when you have plenty of time?

Do you rock when things are quiet or when you are in a noisy environment?

If you want to re-habituate toward a state of focus and away from a state of distraction, self-study is the place to start. Understanding your relationship to distraction and your own personal tendencies improves your productivity power.

Here is one thing you can do to gain insights into your strengths and weaknesses and improve your productivity…

For the next few days, pay attention to whenever you felt especially productive or especially prone to distraction. Jot down the following:

  • When did the impulse to distract come up? Or when were you in the productivity zone
  • What were you doing?
  • What was the time of day?
  • Which outlet of distraction did you go to?
  • What was the project you were working on when you felt productive?
  • How was your mood?

Once you have done this look for patterns and themes. For example, do you tend to feel the urge to check social media when you get tired? Do you tend to waste time checking your email when faced with a difficult project or assignment? Do you find that you are super focused when working alone or on a team?

Then, and this is easy, once you’ve figured out your patterns: work with those strengths and avoid those weaknesses.

Once you know the circumstances under which you’re most and least productive, align your most important and challenging tasks with those aspects so you can run on all cylinders.

Self-knowledge is the best form of power and once you know which factors help you and which factors hurt you, you can maximize your strengths and minimize your weaknesses and make a significant improvement in the way you tackle your relationship with productivity.

Don’t worry about what other people or experts do, just focus on what you do best and how you do best.

0 Comment
167 Views